Nadia Hashimi launches congressional campaign from Gaithersburg Library

Dr. Nadia Hashimi launched her congressional campaign for Maryland’s 6th Congressional District on Thursday, October 12, at the Gaithersburg Library gathered before friends, family and interested politicos.

Hashimi, a Potomac Democrat, is running to replace outgoing Rep. John Delaney (D), who is running for president of the United States.

Hashimi’s campaign consultant Toby Chaudhuri – a co-founder of the communications strategy consulting firm SocialxDesign and a former key communications strategist for the Obama White House – kicked off Hashimi’s campaign launch telling the audience of about fifty that “in the few days that Nadia already started exploring this campaign, her name recognition is actually jumping.”

Chaudhuri went on to say “there is a lot of enthusiasm” around Hashimi’s campaign “partially because she is not the same as the other candidates, who are all career politicians” and political insiders.

Chaudhuri said Hashimi could win the race with about a third of the Democratic votes in the CD-6 primary.

Chaudhuri finished his remarks by introducing Dr. Carolyn O’Connor, a Rockville-based family physician.

O’Connor, who is friends with Hashimi, described “Dr. Nadia as a woman of boundless energy and numerous talents.”

Hashimi thanked her friends and supporters for being part of her campaign and officially announced her entrance into the CD-6 Democratic primary.

The 39-year-old pediatrician said people who attend her book clubs would come up to her after the meeting and ask if she is interested in running for public office.

“I didn’t decide to run for office on a whim. And I thought really carefully about what it would mean but also what it would mean for my family,” Hashimi said.

Hashimi and her husband have four children.

Speaking for nearly sixteen minutes, Hashimi enumerated some reasons why she decided to jump into the race:

My work as a pediatrician; my work writing novels about female empowerment, about poverty, about political corruption; my work raising four children; my work as a business manager where I am responsible for employees, and my role as a first-generation American; all of these have given me some insight into the struggles of American families facing today.

Hashimi said she wants to protect veterans, healthcare and will work to prevent further gun violence.

“I am tired of dark money making decisions while families are struggling – and that’s why I’m running,” she said.

Recent campaign finance reports show that Hashimi reported $286,057 in contributions, including a $225,000 loan and a $5,700 candidate contribution. $55,357 of Hashimi’s donations were raised from individual donors.

Hashimi describes herself as “a doctor on a mission.”

Hashimi also spoke about her husband, Amin Amini, who is practicing neurosurgeon, finishing high school in Afghanistan before he and his family fled to Germany as Afghani refugees.

Hashimi grew up in New Jersey until she was twelve and later moved to rural New York state where she worked at her parents’ family-owned deli starting in seventh grade. She graduated from Brandeis University and went on to medical school.

Hashimi and husband moved to Maryland in 2008.

She concluded her speech saying she wants everybody to know what it’s like for an outsider to run for office and encouraged others to get engaged in the process. She said she wants her campaign to be a movement to “reclaim and reframe politics and bring it back to the people.”

Following Hashimi’s speech, Hashimi’s campaign manager, Arzo Wardak, spoke briefly.

“I’ve assembled an amazing team – not just from here; people from California,” Wardak said.

Wardak, who is residing in the District of Columbia, said she never thought of living in Maryland but decided to move to the state to work on Hashimi’s campaign.

She asked attendees to keep in mind that Hashimi’s campaign team are making “immeasurable sacrifices” so Hashimi “can end up on Capitol Hill.”

Hashimi has yet to file her candidacy with the Maryland State Board of Elections.